Wednesday, February 15, 2012

Striving for Simplicity

I feel frazzled and overworked because I've been thinking: market this, market that, do this, do that, edit, edit, edit, review, review, review, blah...


There's no doubt that I enjoy what I do. I love writing. I love reading. I love being an author, but
I've hit a wall where the balance has tipped and my family and spirituality has suffered--I especially felt that right after my Debutante Ball.


Then I came across this article from the 2012 February Ensign Issue by Jan Pinborough, a magazine put out by the LDS church, and I thought, that's me! Not proud of myself, but I am determined to rewrite my life because I am not happy with the direction I've allowed it to fall into. I want a slower, simpler pace--the way it was before I became published. And it is possible, too...




Here's is what the article reads:

"10 Signs of Digital Overload
  1. 1. 
    Slipping away from activities with people to check e-mail or social networking sites.
  2. 2. 
    Checking the same sites repeatedly within a short period of time.
  3. 3. 
    Spending little time outside.
  4. 4. 
    Finding it hard to complete a task such as writing a report without frequently breaking away to check e-mail or unrelated websites.
  5. 5. 
    Spending little time in face-to-face interactions with friends.
  6. 6. 
    Going online or using a digital device when you feel stressed or want to avoid an unpleasant task.
  7. 7. 
    Family members spending most of their time at home in separate rooms interacting with screens.
  8. 8. 
    Frequently using digital devices to entertain a child instead of talking, singing, playing, or reading with him or her.
  9. 9. 
    Checking the computer first thing in the morning, or getting up during the night to use digital devices.
  10. 10. 
    Spending long stretches of time surfing for content, often viewing content that is inappropriate or borderline.

10 Ways to Cut Back

  1. 1. 
    Check and answer e-mail only once or twice a day, at scheduled times.
  2. 2. 
    Use social networking sites only at scheduled times and for a set number of minutes.
  3. 3. 
    Practice a “digital Sabbath”—setting aside one or two days each week to “unplug.”
  4. 4. 
    Leave your cell phone in another room during time with family or friends.
  5. 5. 
    Call instead of texting.
  6. 6. 
    Invite children to help search the house for supplies that can be used in nondigital activities: children’s books, board games, art supplies, and equipment for outside play.
  7. 7. 
    Organize a talent show, art show, or service project with family or friends.
  8. 8. 
    Use Internet-blocking software to keep on task while working.
  9. 9. 
    Limit recreational surfing; watch TV and videos selectively and intentionally.
  10. 10. 
    Keep a gospel-centered perspective, using technology to uplift yourself and people around you."
You see that Borg up here? Well, I feel like that. Click on the source link below it and it will take you to another fabulous article on digital strategies on time management.

Because I miss my kids, my walk through the green parks, and cuddling up with my hubby by the fireplace, I am going to cut back my time here on my blog among other social networks. I will blog once a week here, posting thoughtful things that are important to me. I am still, however, participating in the #AtoZChallenge, so don't worry, I will be around for sure during April.


Have you hit your electronic low yet? If so, how are you handling it?



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7 comments:

  1. Beautiful Elizabeth!! Sometimes you just have to step away from all things electronic and return to the physical world and all the things there that make you happy!! For me cutting back to once a week blog postings really really freed up so much time for me! Good luck! p.s. I'm still drooling over your Wanda Dress!! Astonishing! Take care
    x

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  2. I haven't hit that point yet, but I do recognize glimpses of myself reflected in a couple of those digital overload symptoms. I find myself spending time on Blogger that SHOULD be spent on my WIP. IF I don't learn to discipline myself better, I'll probably end up cutting blogging days down to once a week, too.

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  3. I have found it easy to slip into these ruts too. Lately I have really backed off the blogging and stuff - and I get all my "other" stuff done first. Somehow, I still find the time to blog and email and such. BUT... if the day goes where I don't have as much time for it. That's alright too. Balance is so hard, and tricky. I had to make some major changes, but I feel so much better.

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  4. I read the "10 signs" and said, "Oops!"

    Good luck with your digital rehab.

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  5. Take and break and try and chill, put on a good movie, do something not writing related. Love the photos you posted :))

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  6. I took a month off blogging to refocus on my writing and my health. It really has paid off. I'm moving forward on my projects and have improved my health. I think stepping back for a little bit was the right thing for me.

    I hope you get back into your comfort zone soon, Elizabeth. :)

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  7. I'm stopping by on my rounds to say thanks to the kind folks hosting the A to Z challenge. Thank you! This post really spoke to me, since I often feel overwhelmed by everything we have to do as writers (when so much of it is often NOT writing).

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