Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Show don't Tell #IWSG


IWSG: a place where writers and friends share woes or hugs.
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woman sitting on bed with flying books
Photo by Lacie Slezak @ Unsplash.com

Show, don't tell, they say. Less is more and more is less, they say. Well ... HA!

Sometimes I give longwinded explanations and confuse the masses. I reiterate it into what I think is simpler but still gain a following of mass confusion.

One of my writerly frustrations is teaching or leading. I can do fiction well. But when it comes to something else, it filters out differently from my brain to my mouth. The past few months I've spent hours creating marketing strategies for Masquerade: Oddly Suited and have shared my vision with the anthology authors.

I created some visuals and hope that my effort explains better in depth than jumbled words. My sister once asked me to explain something to her as though she is a 4th grader. I don't want to offend anyone by being too simple.

What are your strategies, techniques, when holding workshops or presentations at author events?


Guess what? Our book releases April 30th! Squeee! We are hosting many events that is building to the climax. We also have an $50 Amazon gift card giveaway:


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About the Anthology

Title: Masquerade: Oddly SuitedRelease date: April 30th, 2019
Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press
Genres: Young Adult Fiction: Romance – General / Paranormal / Contemporary
Print ISBN: 9781939844644
EBook ISBN: 9781939844651


Book cover for Masquerade: Oddly Suited
Find love at the ball...

Can a fake dating game show lead to love? Will a missing key free a clock-bound prince? Can a softball pitcher and a baseball catcher work together? Is there a vampire living in Paradise, Newfoundland? What’s more important—a virtual Traveler or a virtual date to the ball?
Ten authors explore young love in all its facets, from heartbreak to budding passion. Featuring the talents of L.G. Keltner, Jennifer Lane, C.D. Gallant-King, Elizabeth Mueller, Angela Brown, Myles Christensen, Deborah Solice, Carrie-Anne Brownian, Anstice Brown, and Chelsea Marie Ballard.
Hand-picked by a panel of agents and authors, these ten tales will mystify and surprise even as they touch your heart. 



Don your mask and join the party…



badge for Masquerade Ball Blog Hop



12 comments:

  1. I need certain things explained to me very simply. Like math. :)

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  2. When I run workshops I use lots of short exercises, so as well as listening to my explanations students can try out the techniques and we all know everyone has understood – even if that doesn't always happen immediately.

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  3. Sometimes my wife explains things in a complicated manner. Usually with too much information!
    One month to go - get excited.

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    1. I think I do that too. I need to learn how to simplify it after writing it down and mulling it over!

      One more month. yay!

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  4. I've given a few presentations to other writers, as well as non-writing presentations at work. I find it's important to be clear and direct, keep it simple but don't try to dumb it down, and try to illustrate the concepts with visuals, anecdotes, or good metaphors.

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    1. That's true. Simplify v. Dumbing down. I wonder what the difference is? I'll have to look it up. Thanks!

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  5. I've never hosted an author workshop or presentation at an author event.
    However, I am a teacher and so I don't think I'd have a major problem with the teaching aspect of a workshop.
    The real crunch would be when I have to talk about my (as yet non-existent) book. By nature, I am NOT a sales person.

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    1. For me, it feels self-serving to talk about my book and stuff but I suppose I need to get over that fast, don't I? I know what you mean about not being a sales person.

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  6. I'm a classroom teacher in my day job. I also present writing workshops and occasionally teach college courses.

    For me the key: When I'm in the teaching chair, I remember what it's like in the learning chair. Keep it personal and direct, and most importantly--interactive. Talk from your heart and remember that everyone's experience is valid. Come with a heart to help. @mirymom1 from
    Balancing Act

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    1. Samantha, what splendid advice. I love that. Thank you so much!

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